From the May 19 and 26th, 1880 editions of The Princeton Union Clarion, the predecessor to The Princeton Daily Clarion:

SAD ACCIDENTWe learned on Monday, from a reliable source, that a man named Abner Manning, living a few miles north of Wheeling, in Washington Township, fell from his wagon last Saturday and received such injuries from the wheels running over his head as will undoubtedly cause his death soon, if it has not already. He had been to this place that day and was on his return home when the accident happened to him. It is stated that he was drunk.

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A MAN’S NECK BROKEN BY THE FALLING OF A LIMB FROM A BURNING TREE

We are informed that a few days ago a man, whose name we did not learn, had his neck broken by the falling of a limb upon it from a burning tree, on the bank of the White River, near Buena Vista, in Washington Township. He and others were under the tree at the time engaged in fishing. Our informant tellsus that the unfortunate man had but recently come to that section of the county.

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A NEW PLANING MILL

Messers. Joseph Small and J.A. Turner have associated themselves in partnership for the purpose of operating a planing mill. They are putting one up on the corner of North and West Streets, one half a square west of the Hardware Store, and propose naming it Railroad Planing Mill.

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STRAWBERRY FESTIVAL

The ladies of the Presbyterian Church will hold a Strawberry and Ice Cream Festival at their church on Friday and Saturday evenings next, May 27 and 28th. Admission 25 cents.

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The Commissioners’ Court convenes the first Monday in June. Rutenfranz and Kilpatrick give notice that they will apply for licenses to sell whisky by the drink.

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We learn that there were between fifty and sixty persons baptised last Sunday, in the stream a half a mile south of Port Gibson, in this county, by Revs. Sands and Strickland, Regular Baptists.

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Messrs. Osmon & Applegate have located in this place for a short time, at Williams’ Broom Factory, with their machinery for renovating feathers. All who desire to have their feather beds renovated in good style would do well to call on these gentleman. They come well recommended. They also buy old feathers.

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The Educational Column of this paper will be discontinued after this week, for the reasons that we expect to cede the space for political matter and general news, and that Mr. J.T. Erwin, the editor of that column, has accepted a position in the Oakland City Institute, which occupies nearly the whole of his time.

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THE CELEBRATION OF THE FIFTEENTH AMENDMENTLast Thursday witnessed the first celebration by the colored people that ever took place in Princeton...to celebrate the ratification of the Fifteenth Amendment to the Constitution of the United States of America, by which they have been made citizens of our great Republic, equipped with that most essential privilege in the exercise of the prerogatives of American citizens — with that privilege which secures to them representation in their government as well as taxation.

Precisely at the time specified in the programme (10 o’clock a.m.) in the procession formed in the south part of town, at the African M.E. Church, and led by the Princeton Silver Band proceeded to the public square, and thence to the railroad depot where it was joined by delegations from Evansville, Vincennes, and other points, on the arrival of the trains of cars...the procession moved back to the public square and thence to the Fair Grounds.

We counted in the procession forty-one wagons, six buggies and two carriages, besides the band wagon and a large ornamented wagon in which was seated twenty-nine little Sunday School girls dressed in white, who represented the twenty-nine States that had ratified the Fifteenth Amendment; also one young woman representing the Goddess of Liberty. There were, also, a number mounted on horses and a much larger number on foot.

...There were two martial bands, one brass band and the celebrated Princeton Silver Band, employed to furnish music for the occasion. After the basket dinner at the Fair Grounds — of which some Democrats present partook with evident relish — the exercises opened with prayer by Chapala Bass, and after the reading of President Lincoln’s emancipation proclamation, the proclamation of the ratification of the Fifteenth Amendment, several very entertaining addresses were made.

— Email Andrea Howe at andrea@pdclarion.com

— Email Andrea Howe at andrea@pdclarion.com

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