The IHSAA may have got something right

TRAVIS DAVID

Sports editor

As many of you know, I am in the middle of my “vacation” this week.

So why am I bothering you all with this space if I am on vacation?

Well, our sister paper in Mt. Carmel is down a staffer at the moment, so managing editor, Andrea Howe is pulling double duty with putting together the Clarion as well as the Register.

So I did not feel like it would be fair to expect her to pick up my slack on the sports pages while I am away.

So here we are.

I am still enjoying time away from the office and am not putting in more than an hour or so of work each day.

All is good.

Anyway…

My original plan for vacation was to travel around to different golf courses and play as much golf as I could take in.

I am not an early riser, except when I forget to turn the ringer off on my phone and I get phone calls from angry parents.

A lot of you already know the backstory to the previous sentence, so I will spare the rest of you of my new “fan club”.

Where were we...that’s right, me not being an early riser.

Well with the summer temperatures finally here the best time to hit the links are early in the morning or late in the afternoon.

That leaves a lot of downtime in between.

So the last couple of days I have killed a few hours during the warmest parts of the day poolside.

While catching some rays and keeping cool in the water, I couldn’t help but notice a lot of kids having a blast and enjoying their summer.

If you paid attention to the title of this column, you are most likely wondering where the heck I am going with this and how the good ole folks in Indianapolis are tied into this.

Well here we go…

This week is also moratorium week set by the IHSAA -- also commonly referred to as “dead week.”

During dead week, there are to be no athletic activities, which also include conditioning, and coaches are prohibited from having contact with athletes.

Dead week is set aside for the week during the Fourth of July.

Kudos to the IHSAA for implementing this rule -- it may be the best rule they have put into effect.

Only thing I would change is looking into maybe making it 3-4 weeks instead.

Why?

Because kids should be able to enjoy their summer.

Dead week is the only week during the summer in which many athletes get to take a break.

After 10 months of going to class for eight hours a day, then putting in another two or three hours of practice time/events they still have to come home and open their books.

Some kids even attempt having a part time job on top of this arduous workload.

So come summertime, these same kids are asked to attend summer workouts, go to camps, play in summer leagues, etc. etc.

There’s nothing wrong with putting in work to get better. I too participated in some summer events, mainly a baseball league and a few AAU tournaments for wrestling.

But I was under no pressure to commit to my school teams all throughout my summer.

I still was able to enjoy the majority of the sunshine with friends, going to the pool, catching some movies, going to fairs and this and that.

I was able to be a kid, stress free.

It’s bad enough there are certain people who pressure kids into specializing in one sport for an entire year.

Now, we expect teenagers to make a year-long commitment to whichever sports they choose -- sans one week.

How much more weight can our young athletes shoulder?

Travis David is the Daily Clarion Sports Editor and can be reached at 812-220-4843 or sports@pdclarion.com. Follow him on Twitter @PDCprepsports and @Tdavid_21.

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